Disruption: Newspapers, TV and agencies edition

The Washington Post - Recast for a Digital Future Where we hold our breath and wish Mr Brauchli the best..

Mr. Brauchli refuses to be held hostage to the past. “There are a lot of nostalgia-drenched people in the journalism field who look back at what newspapers were and have a fairly static view of what they should be,” he said in an interview. “Just because The Washington Post used to be a certain way doesn’t mean The Washington Post has to be that way in the future.” [Link]

Agencies Show Their Age on Mobile

Fish where the fish are is a terrible phrase, but when it comes to Mobile e-commerce..

Mobile strategy is about more than just phones. Mobile platforms and engagement strategies in our digitally enabled world need to support all marketing initiatives, both offline and online, and be truly multi-channel. Mobile maturity is one area, however, where brands and agencies are playing catch-up with consumer demand. [Link]

Meanwhile..

This is not about the future, the future has already arrived. Just think for a moment about how you access the web..

Since 2009, the rate of mobile Internet use has consistently doubled every year. See the chart on the right. The global numbers reaffirm what we already know: the use of the mobile Web is permeating the everyday existence of people around the world. Developers and business can look at the numbers and be assured that the decision to go “mobile first” will eventually be the right choice. Companies that have built the foundation for success on the mobile Web now will be the future leaders of the space, from advertising to software deployment and every space in between. [Link]

New Service Will Stream Local TV Stations

Barry Diller back reinventing TV because the networks won't or can't..

“Nobody wants to buy a box,” Mr. Kanojia said. Clutching his white iPhone, he said, “this is what people want to buy. Make this into the box.”

In a demonstration on Monday, he seamlessly passed a station signal from his iPhone to a flat-screen TV using the Apple TV box. The Roku box will also be supported.

Exploiting the rapid growth of broadband, the service, in essence, makes broadcast TV easier to time-shift and place-shift. Whether it succeeds or not, it’s a testament to the intense pressure on traditional TV to either innovate, or be innovated around. [Link]