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FaceBook Friends Distance
Everywhere I turn in media I bump into a Facebook story; and it's not the usual chatter. Of course we all know of the movie, and we now know of Facebook Groups, but it's interesting to see our cultural commentators, such as Frank Rich and Malcolm Gladwell, sidling up alongside the likes of Anil Dash and Umair Haque to write about Facebook. Even the movie Catfish is referred to in a dig at Facebook.

I wrote last week about how Facebook Likes are the low bar for online campaign success measurement, by pointing out how easy it is to Like a brand, yet that action alone doesn't suggest that anything is really happening. All the recent chatter is different - it has tended to lean toward, not exactly negativity, but at least to a perceived weariness amongst these commentators.

It makes me wonder what's happening but it certainly feels like they, or we, have reached a collective nadir. Facebook clearly isn't going away any time soon, but now that it resides in the rarified, and often vilified, air that it shares with Google and Microsoft, the only direction it can go now is down.

Unless Zuckerberg keeps moving the goal posts to retain media attention.

Perhaps we are entering a period of social media malaise - a tipping point. Below are some recent articles about Facebook:

Keeping Our Distance, the Facebook Way - Damon Darlin
Twitter and Facebook cannot change the real world - Malcolm Gladwell
Facebook Politicians are not Your Friends - Frank Rich
The Social Media Bubble - Umair Haque
Facebook: The Reckoning - Anil Dash

And just today on Twitter - as i predicted, facebook built a subprime ecosystem. twitter didn't here's the evidence @ev /via @umairh

Ogilvy's Chief Creative Officer spanks his digital team

Banksy does the Simpsons and it's truthy